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Tracing the Origins of Vampirism

Posted on November 17, 2009

To trace back to the origins of vampirism we must travel back in time to an era that pre-dates Christianity by over a thousand years. Druids are said to have believed that two of their major Gods of the Harvest were banished into the flames of the sun and destroyed, later to return as vampires.

From this point in time onwards any would be researcher must persist in a journey through an impenetrable fog of fantasy, fiction, folk lore and myths if he or she is to find anything that even resembles a satisfactory answer, let alone a plausible conclusion to this centuries old mystery. This article does little more than scratch the surface; many more generations of intrepid investigators need to sift out the facts from the fiction.

The purpose of my article is not to foolishly claim I have any answers that warrant credulity in any sense, but to present some of the documented theories into the open – to inspire debate and discussion.

The word ‘vampire’ (vampir, vampyre) has its origins in Slavonic, but with similarities in: Russian, Polish, Czech, Serbian and Bulgarian. In addition to these similar words can also be found in early Greek, Danish, Swedish and Hungarian languages.

All the above cultures and their respective religions share one common denominator in regard to Sanguinarian Vampirism. The belief that the vampire is an ‘undead’ creature of either male or female gender, and thirsts for blood to sustain its horrid existence. Another point worthy of note, is that all the cultures listed here hold the firm belief that a Holy or consecrated object will protect any living or dead victim. This belief has survived the rigours of time to such an extent, that in certain areas of Greece it is still customary to place a consecrated object between the lips of a deceased person, or even sew the mouth shut to prevent the entrance or indeed exit of any evil spirit.

There is a school of thought which suggests vampirism was in fact a concept created by the early Roman Catholic church to instill fear into the hearts of the masses, claiming that the only protection against evil – in the form of ‘vampires’ – lay within the teachings of Christian religions.

It is also worth noting that through various stages of history, the vampire has changed in form and appearance to meet contemporary ideals. Most notable of all being the period prior to the seventeenth century where this dreaded blood thirsty creature gained the ability of shape shifting – ultimately taking on the conveniently menacing shape and habits of the vampire bat. However, when considering this fact the reader should bear in mind that vampires existed long before discovery of this species of bat – native to Central and South America.

In Australia, Native Aborigine’s have long held the belief in the power of blood and its effectiveness in curing sickness and giving an ill person more life.

In West Africa and other areas of Africa, blood is revered for its power. If a person sheds blood, it has to be covered, to prevent evil spirits from gorging on it and seeking out the person to whom it belongs. Should it be successful, the spirit may revitalize the body of the dead and destroy the body and soul of the living.

All the above references are in regard, albeit briefly, to Sanguinarian Vampirism. By definition, a creature that gorges and feasts on the blood of humans and animals to sustain its own existence.

Allied to Sanguinarian Vampirism, is the equally ancient belief in the existence of the Psychic Vampire. A culture of vampirism, although less gory, it is if anything, more prevalent in modern society than its bloody counterpart.

(NB: The author would like to add that in no way does he condone the practice of vampirism and points out that practitioners of Sanguinarian Vampirism, in modern times also leave themselves prone to diseases such as septicaemia and HIV/AIDS)”.

Sent in by Wayne Ridsdel, Copyright 2009




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Tags: Blood, Druids, Psychic Vampires, Sanguinarian, Vampire Mythology


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Comments

3 Responses to “Tracing the Origins of Vampirism”
  1. Bitten says:

    I love the Lilith/Cain story. I’m gonna use this for the story of creation in my book. I’ve been researching Lilith for a while. Thank you

  2. Marisol says:

    Hi,
    Do you know how long ago the Druid vampire legends originated? I’m intereted in studing vampirism, including it’s origins. I beleve that the earlist vampire legengs were Sumerian in origin. How about the Lilith story? What’s the earliest account of that?

  3. peter says:

    i don’t belive in any vampaie,they are evil spirit that don’t want go to hell.after the beat they exchange ur soul to the devil to live in the land of the living.to kill people for the devil. Vampira are bloodstucker evil.

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